«State of the Art»

«State of the Art Symposium»

Bedeutendster MS-Fachkongress schweizweit. Der jährliche Anlass richtet sich an Neurologen, Fachärzte, Forschende und paramedizinische Berufspersonen.

«State of the Art Symposium» - The most important scientific MS event in Switzerland. This annual event targets neurologists, doctors, researchers and other experts.

22nd State of the Art Symposium 2020

«Addressing patients’ needs - finding the right treatment for the individual patient»

January 25th, 2020 at the KKL Luzern

Register now
Registration fee: CHF 150.00 (early bird CHF 120.00, until 15.12.2019)

  • General Information

    Organisation
    Swiss MS Society and its Scientific Advisory Board

    Venue
    KKL Luzern
    Europaplatz 1, CH-6005 Lucerne
    KKL Luzern Website

    Public transport
    The Symposium venue is only a few steps from the SBB Mainstation.

  • Credits

    The Swiss Neurological Society awards 5 credit points.

  • Contacts
    Administration

    Luana Pellegrini
    Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Sponsoring

    Christof Knüsli
    Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Public Relations & Fundraising

    Marc Lutz
    Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Society

Programme Committee

Lutz Achtnichts, Aarau | Andrew Chan, Bern | Cristina Granziera, Basel
Jürg Kesselring, Valens | Sven Schippling, Zurich


Videos 21st State of the Art Symposium - 2019

21st State of the Art Symposium – Bernhardt Hemmer: What have we learned from Genetic Studies in MS?

21st State of the Art Symposium – Bernhardt Hemmer: What have we learned from Genetic Studies in MS?

The increased heritability within families and the directly proportional decrease in risk with degree of relatedness argue that genetic factors play a prominent...

The increased heritability within families and the directly proportional decrease in risk with degree of relatedness argue that genetic factors play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Over the last decade major progress has been made in identifying genetic factors that are associated with MS risk. Besides the Human Leukocyte Alleles (HLA)-DRB1*1501, DRB1*1303 and DRB1*0301, more than 200 genetic variants have been identified that are associated with MS. HLA alleles and the majority of genetic variants are related to immune cells supporting the concept that MS is primarily an immune mediated disease. With the discovery of an increasing number of genetic variants it has become possible to identify pathways in the immune system that are related to disease pathogenesis providing the basis for the development of new treatment strategies. Moreover, it has become evident that particular phenotypes or even treatment responses are influenced by genetic factors. Likewise, the extent of intrathecal IgG synthesis, the development of antibodies to biopharmaceuticals or the risk of side effects of MS drugs were shown to be associated with genetic factors.

Currently major efforts are underway to understand the impact of genetic factors on disease progression. The results of these studies will help to better understand the molecular mecha-nisms underlying disease progression and possibly pave the way for new strategies to treat progressive MS.

Bernhard Hemmer, Munich (DE)
Technical University Munich
Department of Neurology

21st State of the Art Symposium – Ari Waisman: Mechanism of CNS Inflammation

21st State of the Art Symposium – Ari Waisman: Mechanism of CNS Inflammation

The role of IL-17 and the microbiota IL-17A and IL-17F are two cytokines with similar biological activities, who bind the same receptor and are produced by T...

The role of IL-17 and the microbiota
IL-17A and IL-17F are two cytokines with similar biological activities, who bind the same receptor and are produced by T cells called Th17. A clear role for IL-17A was shown in different autoimmune diseases, including psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, but their role in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, is controversially discussed. We have previously shown that mice lacking IL-17A or IL-17F are only partially, if at all, protected from EAE, suggesting that these cytokines are not critical for disease pathogenesis.

We could show now that the role of IL-17 EAE is critically dependent on the gut microbiota. We show that the main pathogenic role of IL-17 is medicated in the gut and is transmitted via the gut microbiota. Mice lacking IL-17A and IL-17F are resistant to EAE, but can be made susceptible to the disease if supplemented with the microbiota of wild type animals. Moreover, we could show that ectopic expression of IL-17A in the gut, but not anywhere else, is sufficient to regain susceptibility to the disease via regulating the microbiota. Our data suggest that IL-17 is a major regulator of gut microbiota and it contribute to disease pathogenicity by affecting the microbiota and not directly cells of the body.

Ari Waisman, Mainz (DE)
University Medical Center Mainz

21st State of the Art Symposium – Melinda Magyari: Facing Challenges with MS and Old Age

21st State of the Art Symposium – Melinda Magyari: Facing Challenges with MS and Old Age

The incidence, prevalence and the average age of persons of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) is increasing. This is a result of increased life expectancy of...

The incidence, prevalence and the average age of persons of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) is increasing. This is a result of increased life expectancy of the general population as well as the availability and effectiveness of disease-modifying therapies (DMT).

However, aging with MS presents great challenges. With advancing age, the disease transitions towards a less inflammatory and more neurodegenerative course. Aging with MS, as in the general population, is accompanied by the development and accumulation of comorbidities which complicates the medical management of MS.

The currently approved therapies to treat MS are not as effective in preventing the disability progression associated with higher age and progressive disease as they are in preventing relapses. Trials of existing DMT generally were not designed for persons with age higher than 55 years and since a substantial portion remain in the relapsing phase, information on the safety and efficacy of DMT in this population is greatly needed. The vast majority of therapies approved in RRMS have failed clinical trials in progressive MS and there are only few options for DMT in individuals with progressive MS, who represent the majority of persons with MS over age 65.

Because clinical trials for existing DMTs have purposefully excluded aging persons with MS, there is insufficient knowledge on safety and efficacy of DMTs in elderly populations. Real-world studies are needed to identify the impact the DMTs have in elderly persons MS.

Cognitive decline is a particular issue in the elderly population with MS, but studies evaluating symptomatic therapies for cognition in elderly persons MS have been largely negative.

Beside medical treatment, an emphasis should be more holistic, including social support and cognitive training, in order to improve quality of life for the aging population with MS.

Melinda Magyari, Copenhagen (DK)
University Hospital Rigshospitalet Copenhagen
Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center

21st State of the Art Symposium – Andrew Chan: A Swiss Treatment Consensus for MS

21st State of the Art Symposium – Andrew Chan: A Swiss Treatment Consensus for MS

More than a dozen substances are meanwhile available for the disease-modifying immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, for some substances there is a...

More than a dozen substances are meanwhile available for the disease-modifying immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, for some substances there is a clear difference between approval in Switzerland (Swissmedic) and neighbouring countries (European Medicines Agency, EMA). In addition, limitations imposed by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH) in the specialties list (SL) have significant effects on use in daily clinical practice. We will present consensus recommendations which were reviewed and agreed upon by the Scientific Advisory Board of the Swiss Multiple Sclerosis Society and the Swiss Neurological Society. We explicitly focus on practice-relevant differences in the approval of MS immunotherapies in Switzerland compared with the EMA area and discuss further limitations (SL) and their impact on the use in clinical practice. Immunotherapies with the same approval in Switzerland and the EMA area and symptomatic therapies will not be discussed.

Andrew Chan, Bern
University Hospital Bern
Department of Neurology

21st State of the Art Symposium – Michael Linnebank: Long Term Risks of MS Treatment

21st State of the Art Symposium – Michael Linnebank: Long Term Risks of MS Treatment

The recent years yielded an increasing spectrum of symptomatic as well as disease modifying therapies for relapsing and progressive MS. It is dangerous not to...

The recent years yielded an increasing spectrum of symptomatic as well as disease modifying therapies for relapsing and progressive MS. It is dangerous not to treat MS, but also treatment strategies are associated with several known and possibly yet unknown risks.

Current disease modifying therapies include classic immunomodulators, drugs that target immune trafficking, drugs which interfere with immune cells on the DNA level and medications that attack defined types of immune cells. There seems to be some correlation between drug efficacy and adverse events, but the distinct products exhibit specific risks, which need to be addressed in patient counselling.

Concerning the new drugs, not all relevant risks are known today. Also dietary strategies or intake of vitamin and other supplements implicate several adverse effects especially in long-term applications. Symptomatic therapies, e.g. aiming at improving fatigue, spasticity, bladder dysfunction or walking impairment, are associated with adverse events and risks, too. Valuing risks and benefits of the different therapies poses an important challenge of current patient care. This talk will provide an up-date of knowledge about the details of long term risks of MS treatment.

Michael Linnebank, Hagen (DE)
University Witten/Herdecke
Clinic Hagen-Ambrock

21st State of the Art Symposium – Podium Discussion on MS Treatment: The Challenges ahead!

21st State of the Art Symposium – Podium Discussion on MS Treatment: The Challenges ahead!

In this Podium Discussion the participants will elaborate on the most important questions raised in the plenary speeches. The focus is on the currently...

In this Podium Discussion the participants will elaborate on the most important questions raised in the plenary speeches. The focus is on the currently available treatment options and the challenges in MS treatment that lie ahead.

Andrew Chan, Bern
University Hospital Bern
Department of Neurology

Michael Linnebank, Hagen (DE)
University Witten/Herdecke
Clinic Hagen-Ambrock

Christian Kamm, Lucerne
Luzerner Kantonsspital
Neurocenter

Ludwig Kappos, Basel
University Hospital Basel
Department of Neurology

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